Running Bitcoin - Bitcoin Wiki

IdealCash

IdealCash deal coin is a Decentralized Digital Currency based on an Open-Source Peer-To-Peer Internet Protocol. It provides Proof-of-Stake (PoS) Block Generation Methods with separated target limits, granting everyone a 30% floating coin return rate! Also, transaction fee’s are extremely low, it’s only 0.0001 to transfer 10000000.00 coins!
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Bitcoin Core painfully slow sync times + missing bitcoin.conf file?

So I've always had trouble syncing my bitcoin qt client, the times are painfully slow, (if it's even progressing at all) and I found out that the bitcoin.conf file is not created automatically and couldn't find out how to create one, there are so many flags to use. Any help?
submitted by BestServerNA to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Please help - why is my Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory?

I am running a Bitcoin Core GUI-based full node on Windows 10. The conf file is in my bitcoin data directory, instead of being in the appdata/roaming folder. But bitcoind and bitcoin-cli continue to look for the conf file in that appdata/roaming folder, which I guess is the reason the bitcoind server never appears to start. However, Bitcoin-qt (the GUI) appears to work fine and is also pointing to the conf file correctly. I checked by opening the conf file from the settings>options.

How do I start bitcoind and check if it is running or not? If I run it on cmd, it appears to start downloading the whole blockchain again, which is unnecessary because I already have all of it.
submitted by niranjanrao1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Please help - why is the Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory?

I am running a Bitcoin Core GUI-based full node on Windows 10. The conf file is in my bitcoin data directory, instead of being in the appdata/roaming folder. But bitcoind and bitcoin-cli continue to look for the conf file in that appdata/roaming folder, which I guess is the reason the bitcoind server never appears to start. How do I start bitcoind and check if it is running or not? If I run it on cmd, it appears to start downloading the whole blockchain again, which is unnecessary because I already have all of it.
submitted by niranjanrao1 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Please help - why is my Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory? /r/Bitcoin

Please help - why is my Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Where is the bitcoin.conf file stored on Windows?

When running bitcoin-qt.exe for the first time where are the files supposed to be stored?
submitted by LightShadow to BitcoinABC [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core painfully slow sync times + missing bitcoin.conf file? /r/Bitcoin

Bitcoin Core painfully slow sync times + missing bitcoin.conf file? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Please help - why is the Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory? /r/BitcoinBeginners

Please help - why is the Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory? /BitcoinBeginners submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

At this point in time, what should my bitcoin.conf file look like?

Specifically, I want to know which values to set for paytxfee and relayfee. Using bitcoind version 130000
submitted by charlesfries to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Trying to get Bitcoin-Qt on OSX to read $HOME/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf file

The GUI says it can't open the file, but it's clearly there. My main goal is to have the data and index on a separate disk.
submitted by george1421 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What does your systemd/bitcoin.conf file look like for BU?

I searched around but didn't see anything obvious, is this right?
/etc/systemd/system/bitcoind.service
[Unit] Description=Bitcoin daemon serivce After=network.target [Service] Type=simple User=bitcoin ExecStart=/usbin/bitcoind -datadir=/etc/bitcoind -prune=15000 -listen -maxconnections=100 -port=8333 -disablewallet -blockmaxsize=8000000 [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target 
submitted by LightShadow to btc [link] [comments]

Trying to get Bitcoin-Qt on OSX to read $HOME/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf file /r/Bitcoin

Trying to get Bitcoin-Qt on OSX to read $HOME/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf file /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

At this point in time, what should my bitcoin.conf file look like? /r/Bitcoin

At this point in time, what should my bitcoin.conf file look like? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Where is the bitcoin.conf file stored on Windows? /r/BitcoinABC

Where is the bitcoin.conf file stored on Windows? /BitcoinABC submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What does your systemd/bitcoin.conf file look like for BU? /r/btc

What does your systemd/bitcoin.conf file look like for BU? /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Where is bitcoin.conf file on Windows 0.11.0 install?

I want to add the commands to restrict transaction flooding for my node. But I can't find this file, nor where I should put it (if it is I need to create it).
submitted by allgoodthings1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-qt datadir alternative storage location

I tried asking this in the bitcoincore sub yesterday, but it only has a handful of members and got no answers, so i now try here.
When bitcoin-qt is first started, it asks for the location of datadir. If it is set to a custom location, it remembers it on subsequent launches. Where is this location stored, as no bitcoin.conf is generated in the default location, and i have not seen any other documentation to specify datadir except command line option and bitcoin.conf file?
submitted by varikonniemi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

PSA: Enable Tor as a simple way to make your node reachable.

Become one of the 10% of node operators that receive incoming connections.
Installing bitcoin core is easy, and with pruning it really isn't the space sink it is characterized as. Even a modest computer can complete the initial block download (IBD) and become a full node. But what some users (90%) find a bit more challenging, is how to become a listening node. Listening nodes are an important part of the network, and are simple enough to enable. I can think of 4 ways to do it:
  1. Operate on an OS and Network that support uPnP, allowing bitcoin to open the ports for you.
  2. Subscribe to a VPN that allows you to open ports through their service.
  3. Manually configure your OS and network to forward port 8333 and 18333.
  4. Run Tor and direct bitcoin to listen through it.
I'll discuss #4. Obviously #1 or #2 are easier, but require a VPN subscription or uPnP enabled HW. And if you live in a dorm or don't control the network, Tor may be the only free option available.
As a bit of background, bitcoin supports three networks that your node can listen on:
Obviously, the more you enable, the better, but here are the basic steps for Tor in broad strokes. If you have any questions post them here and I'll see if we can't help you out:
  1. Download, verify1 and install Gpg4win
  2. Download, verify2, install, and launch Tor Browser
  3. Download, verify3, install, and launch Bitcoin Core
  4. Launch and Admin command console in the directory containing tor.exe
  5. Install the Tor service: tor.exe --service install
  6. CD to service dir: cd %windir%\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\tor
  7. Create and edit a file called torrc with the contents suggested below
  8. Restart tor: tor.exe --service stop && tor.exe --service start
  9. Record the hostname: type .\HiddenService\hostname as
  10. Add the bitcoin.conf options suggested below
  11. Restart the bitcoin-qt program
  12. (Optional) Activate the bitnodes crawler at https://bitnodes.io/nodes/-8333/
It may take a while for your node to show up on bitnodes. I've found the check button sometimes has trouble with onions. Of course you don't need to do it, but it can provide a simple way to check status once your on the list.

torrc file: (replace c:\windows with the proper path as needed)

```

Change to C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming

Log notice file \tor\service.log

Bridges may be needed if the Gov't shuts down Tor exit nodes. Get Bridges by

emailing [email protected] from Gmail (only) and uncomment as follows:

Bridge obfs4 : cert= iat-mode=

HiddenServiceDir \tor\HiddenService HiddenServiceVersion 2 HiddenServicePort 8333 127.0.0.1:8333 HiddenServicePort 18333 127.0.0.1:18333 ```

bitcoin.conf file: (entries to be ADDED)

```

Change to what you recorded earlier

onion=127.0.0.1:9050 listen=1 externalip= discover=1 ```
Footnotes:
  • 1 Cert: {Subject: Intevation GmbH; SHA1: c13a65963ad53e78694dd223d518007791a05fe4}
  • 2 PGP Signing Key: 0xEF6E286DDA85EA2A4BA7DE684E2C6E8793298290
  • 3 PGP Signing Key: 0x01EA5486DE18A882D4C2684590C8019E36C2E964
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Pairing Bitcoin Mobile Wallet to Full Node on Tor

Will a mobile wallet be able to connect to a full node operating solely on the tor network (bitcoin.conf file has onlynet=onion).
I'm guessing that if the mobile is networking on clear net, then no. The question then is.... Is there a way of getting a light mobile client to connect to nodes only through the tor network.
For info, I'm not referencing any particular wallet here, could it be done via Electrum, bitcoin wallet, mycelium etc
submitted by BankingOnMyOwn to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Where does the Bitcoin-QT options dialog store options

When running Bitcoin-QT, there is an options dialog you can get to in the GUI under Settings. I've played with some of these settings and they don't store where I would expect. I've run some tests, on Windows 10, and it they are not housed in the bitcoin.conf file. What's more the settings persist if you change named conf files.
Is it housed in the registry or some other file on the filesystem?
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

Solo Mining Bitcoin Node

I have a Gekko NewPac USB miner that I bought for fun while getting started. Overclocked, I average around 50 Gh/s.
The machine it’s connected to has a full Bitcoin Node on it. I’ve enabled the wallet, and would like to point my Gekko miner at the node via cgminer for solo mining, just as a lottery. I know the odds.
I’ve tried following several guides, but they are all fairly old. Is this still possible? And if so, can anybody help me with the bitcoin.conf file?
submitted by travelsandtrivia to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

9. bitcoind Bitcoin Core: Data Directory of Old Hard Drive with Bitcoin Blockchain Configuration Beginner's guide to solo bitcoin and litecoin mining ... How to mine bitcoins (solo mining) with the core client ... VoskCoin - YouTube

Bitcoin.conf Configuration File. All command-line options (except for -conf) may be specified in a configuration file, and all configuration file options may also be specified on the command line. Command-line options override values set in the configuration file. The configuration file is a list of setting=value pairs, one per line, with optional comments starting with the '#' character. The ... The above one is the default file path for Bitcoin and this is the data directory where you should find all your cryptocurrency wallet core files. Within each coin folder there will be a .conf file located. The bitcoin.conf file is not created by default, you will need to create it yourself. And also, I never had a c:\users\[username]\appdata\roaming\bitcoin folder as many online answers will suggest, this is because when I installed the bitcoin core program, I chose to put my data directory in a different place than default. In order for them to recognize and trust each other, you need to set rpcpassword, which is written in the file ~/.bitcoin / bitcoin.conf as rpcpassword=blah-blah-blah. If you do not have such a file you need to create it. There you can register and other settings from those given when starting the daemon. How it Works . Accordingly, the only thing you need to accept bitcoins is a bitcoin ... Bitcoin-S uses HOCON to configure various parts of the application the library offers. HOCON is a superset of JSON, that is, all valid JSON is valid HOCON. All configuration for Bitcoin-S is under the bitcoin-s key.. If you have a file application.conf anywhere on your classpath when using bitcoin-s, the values there take precedence over the ones found in our reference.conf.

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9. bitcoind

*i forgot to use my adjusted config file, they both are working decently. Use what comforts you. Category Gaming; Show more Show less. Loading... Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested ... How to run a Bitcoin Full Node(Linux + Build from Source) - Duration: 14:13. ... Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 3 - bitcoin.conf - Duration: 8:10. m1xolyd1an Recommended for you. 8:10 . How To: Bitcoin ... This video features a screen grab of CGMiner solo mining Bitcoin using a single GekkoScience 2PAC-2 Bitcoin USB Mining Stick -- Sold on Amazon: http://amzn.t... *****UPDATE***** Solo mining has been removed from client. I'll keep the video up for how it used to work, it might still work for some alt coins (unsure) yo... VoskCoin is the best source of cryptocurrency news, reviews, and tutorials. VoskCoin reviews popular cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum as well as...

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